Building a Generation of Book Lovers

I have been thinking a lot about children’s literature lately. As I prepare to begin my journey into a career in publishing I have been contemplating the critical role that children play in the future of publishing.

Playstations. Xboxes. Game Cubes. Tablets. Smart Phones. With the abundance of digital game centers kids are becoming increasingly less apt to choose a book over a game. The simple pleasure of discovering the twists and turns of the plot, befriending the characters, and getting lost in a new and exciting world seems to be foreign to many children.

A recent study by commissioned by the National Reading Campaign in Canada, authored by Sharon Murphy, indicated that choice was a “key factor in instilling a love of reading.” The report’s primary aim was to uncover the factors that promote a nation of people who love to read as opposed to simply a literate nation.

The research touched on numerous telling aspects about children’s engagement in reading and the effect of gender, age, choice of content, and reading environment on the amount of pleasure derived from reading. The most compelling finding was that even those children who identified themselves as frequent readers would not read texts other than those that were assigned to them. This indicates that the way in which reading is being taught in schools is actually stifling children’s enjoyment of reading.

If given the choice of the types of book they would like to read, children will be much more receptive to reading as an act of pleasure as opposed to a mandatory chore. Children in the study also positively responded to a change in environment. When taken out of the formal setting of the classroom and put into a more “comfy” setting the children became much more social, comfortable, and confident in themselves and in the opinions about what they had read.

I was read to as a child and know the importance that foundation in reading has played in my life as both an avid reader and writer. Fostering the love of books in children is something that I believe is critical, especially now that our world is becoming so increasingly focused on the digital sphere. In order to get children to become active and engaged readers, we must carefully nurture the love of reading from an early age. I believe that the future of publishing is strongly dependent upon instilling our children with a love of reading that will carry through into adulthood. Empower your children–give them the wonderful gift of the joy of reading.

Check out the full details of the study on Publishers Weekly.

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3 Comments

Filed under Book Publishing, Uncategorized

3 responses to “Building a Generation of Book Lovers

  1. I am extremely impressed with your writing skills
    and also with the layout on your weblog. Is this a paid theme or did you
    customize it yourself? Either way keep up the nice quality writing, it’s rare to
    see a nice blog like this one these days.

    • Thanks for your kind comment! I really appreciate it and I’m glad that you enjoyed my post. The theme is actually just a free theme that I selected since it tied in with the theme of my blog. Thanks again, and stay tuned for more blogs 🙂

  2. “The most compelling finding was that even those children who identified themselves as frequent readers would not read texts other than those that were assigned to them. This indicates that the way in which reading is being taught in schools is actually stifling children’s enjoyment of reading.”

    Hi Chelsea,

    Nice letter. I’d like to hear more about the quoted piece above. I think you’re on to something here.

    Unfortunately, our children are not taught to stretch their minds to explore new horizons. They are, in fact, given predetermined materials to regurgitate, then forget. The love of reading (& Learning) is no longer instilled.

    We desperately need to see the return of a rigorous education, akin to our forefathers’.

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