Tag Archives: Mystery

Little Grey Cells, Order and Method-Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot

The most curious little man to behold-slight in stature but imposing in manner, a comical egg-shaped head, impeccably groomed moustaches, spotless suits, tailored to perfection, and trademark shining patent leather shoes. I am of course referring to Agatha Christie’s master detective, the illustrious Hercule Poirot. He stole my heart from the moment I first watched David Suchet’s superb characterization of the iconic Belgian sleuth. I watched with delight at his endearing eccentricities and his astounding powers of deduction. I found myself chuckling at the comical exchanges between Poirot and his protégé, Arthur Hastings, and feeling perplexed at the seemingly unsolvable murders they set out to unravel together. Each episode enveloped me into the cozy and intriguing world of little grey cells, order and method. In watching these episodes I felt bursts of the sensory experience of reading, and then as a book lover, I decided that it was high time that I actually read Christie’s short stories and novels.

I recently finished the first in a beautiful clothbound Folio Society edition of the Hercule Poirot short stories. The quaint little man, as Hastings so often refers to Poirot, is so eccentric in the particulars of his dress and his insistence on order and method that he immediately endears himself to the reader. One cannot help but be fascinated by the meticulous little Belgian with an impeccable eye for detail, in both fashion and murder. His reliance on his “little grey cells” to solve the most impossible cases baffles and infuriates the amateur Hastings and the gritty Inspector Japp. Though they may share moments of annoyance or lack of understanding for Poirot’s manner, it is always his discerning nature that manages to solve even the most unruly of cases.

Each of Christie’s mysteries are tightly woven tales of intrigue, and only Poirot’s keen perception of the significance of seemingly insignificant details enables the villains to be caught. As I read each of the incredible scenarios that Poirot is called upon to investigate, I found myself marveling at Christie’s power of imagination and deduction. Her title as the “Queen of Mystery” is one no other author can hope to challenge.

From quaint rural villages, to seaside towns, to the bustling metropolises of London and other cities on the Continent-Poirot’s sleuthing skills never falter. Christie brings the perfect blend of intrigue and danger, coupled with the levity of Poirot’s interactions with Hastings and Japp, and his endearing, albeit fastidious, mannerisms to each story. Strychnine poisoning, missing jewels, apparent suicides, and curses of ancient Egyptian pharaohs are just a few of the cases that Poirot brings his expertise to. All the while maintaining an appearance of the utmost elegance, this delightful dandy captures the hearts of readers with his eccentric demeanor and unfailing powers of deduction.

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Discovering the Saints of the Shadow Bible

I recently had the pleasure of meeting an intriguing author at BookPeople, Austin’s favorite indie bookstore. Readers of my blog will know that meeting an author, for me, is a giddy experience that sends my emotions and writerly aspirations bubbling. Last summer I learned of Ian Rankin, bestselling Scottish mystery author, known for his Inspector Rebus series, and I recently finished reading his latest triumph, Saints of the Shadow Bible.

Detective Sergeant John Rebus was new to me, and as I was introduced to this maverick of the Scottish police force, I found myself eager to learn more. As a rule, I never start a series anywhere except the beginning. And yet, in this case I made an exception. I’d heard so much about Ian’s incredible talent for crime writing and the captivating character he’s created in John Rebus that I felt compelled to start at the end. Of course, the fact that Ian would be visiting BookPeople in January to discuss his latest book may have had more than a little to do with my decision.

I was well rewarded in my decision to stray from my reading norm. From the moment I picked up the book I was entranced. Rankin’s ability to create a world and characters with such striking realism is what makes him one of the greats in mystery fiction. Having been to Edinburgh myself, I could envision myself trudging down the cold and dreary streets of Scotland’s capital city with the veteran detective. As I journeyed through the novel with Rebus, I found myself working to decipher both him and the intricate threads of connectivity being woven through the mystery.

Following the plot is akin to meandering through the streets of Edinburgh, taking twists and turns into alleys and side streets, discovering unexpected establishments and beguiling characters along the way. All the while you’re keenly aware that there is a mystery to solve and subtle clues are all around. You are supposed to be stringing the pieces together. Connecting the yarn on your map of the city. Taking cue from Rebus’s Holmesian bloodhound instinct. And yet, you find yourself befuddled. Captivated by the charismatic (if rough around the edges) Rebus, frustrated by the methodical Fox, and intrigued by the murky history of the Saints of the Shadow Bible.  Rebus recalls Doyle’s Sherlock and Christie’s Poirot, those icons of mystery whose skills of observation and detection emit a superhuman quality that mystifies and baffles those of us not gifted with their keen eye. Yet, he still maintains those quirks and flaws that make him unquestionably human, and relatable.

Rankin is a master storyteller with a gift for drawing characters of such complexity and undeniable realism, that the reader cannot help but feel adamant that they in fact could be found sitting in the local CID in Edinburgh. He writes of his home in Edinburgh, as only can one intimately acquainted with her. The cobblestone streets, the historic churches and castle, striking architecture and landscape all pulse with life. The city and all its secret dealings, the mingling of the political parties with less than reputable characters, and the police’s bid to get a handle on it all strike a chord with the reader as interactions not far removed from reality. Add to that the thread of upheaval currently pervading the political climate in Scotland, and Rankin’s Edinburgh bursts will intrigue, mystery, life, and believability.

I am, without a doubt, now a part of the Rebus following and have a lot of catching up to do on the history of the saints, the seedy underbelly of police work in Edinburgh CID, and the evolution of one of the most captivating detectives in contemporary mystery fiction.

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